Oatmeal Molasses Bread

27 Feb

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Today’s recipe is one that reminds me of my childhood in Nova Scotia and the Saturday Farmer’s Market where we bought it.    It reminds me of drizzly mornings at our kitchen table with thick slices of this bread covered in a layer of butter (and sometimes even some molasses on top of that).  I’ve never found another bread that has the same moist and spongy consistency.  And one that seems to be loved by everyone who tries it.

Yes, I am this bread’s #1 fan.

This past week-end I made one big loaf of this Oatmeal Molasses Bread and two smaller loaves.  The large loaf was scoffed down in no less than 5 minutes and the other two I froze for a lunch with some good friends this week.  And just to let you know, once unfrozen this bread feels just as fresh as when it comes out of the oven.  This bread can do no wrong.

Here in Italy it’s almost impossible to get your hands on molasses so I have to use  my stash sparingly.   And I’m pretty sure there is no real substitute for it as well (if you know one please let me know).  I think it’s the key ingredient to making this bread so moist and…perfect.  Luckily my husband is traveling to America for work next week and molasses is on his grocery list of things to bring home.

Continue reading for recipe…

Here’s the recipe to give it a try yourself (please do!).

Oatmeal Molasses Bread

2 cups boiling water
1 cup quick cooking oats
1 package active dry yeast (1.4 ounces)
1/2 cup warm water (110-115 degrees)
1/2 cup molasses
1 Tbsp vegetable oil
1 tsp salt
6- 6 1/2 cups flour
1 tsp butter, melted

1. In a bowl pour boiling water over oats.  Let sit until mixture cools (to about 115 degree)

2.Dissolve yeast in warm water. Add the molasses, oil, salt and cooled down oat mixture and 3 cups of the flour.  Mix until smooth.  Slowly add in the rest of the flour (give or take 1/4 cup) to form a soft dough.  Put in mixer with the hook attachment for 5-7  minutes or knead by hand on floured surface 6-8 minutes.  Place in a bowl coated with oil and cover with plastic wrap.  Let stand for in warm place until dough doubles (about 1-1 1/2 hrs).

3.  Punch down dough.  Turn onto floured surface and divide in half.  Shape into loaves and put into pans (I did one big loaf and two smaller ones).  Cover again and let rise for about an hour (or until doubled).

4. Bake at 350 degrees (180) for 40-45 minutes (for big loaf) or until golden brown.  Remove from pan and let cool on wire rack.  Brush tops with melted butter.

Recipe adapted from here.

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4 Responses to “Oatmeal Molasses Bread”

  1. petra February 27, 2013 at 17:15 #

    hey! since when have we canadians given the temperatures in Fahrenheit?! And is dry active yeast the same thing as normal dry yeast? Can I use fresh yeast? I can get molasses so if you are ever stuck (ha!) I can send it to you.

    • Jillian in Italy February 28, 2013 at 12:49 #

      I’m completely messed up now when it comes to measurements and temperatures. Active dry yeast must be the same as normal dry yeast. I think. I ain’t no yeast expert. And I’m sure you could use fresh yeast but would have no idea how much. Glad I could be of so much help!

  2. greta February 27, 2013 at 18:04 #

    Yum! I make a whole wheat bread similar to this–the molasses in it gives it such a rich, yet subtle sweetness. I can’t wait to try your version!

    • Jillian in Italy February 28, 2013 at 12:51 #

      I think next time I’ll try to make this bread with whole wheat flour instead of white flour. Or at least half and half. Let’s hope it keeps the same consistency though! I’d love your recipe too!

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