Tag Archives: morocco

Moroccan Snapshots

8 May

A few weeks ago I went on a beautiful 4 day Moroccan adventure with my mother and step-father.  It was so much fun to take them to one of my favourite places on earth and show them how much the country has to offer everyone who visits.

And I have to admit that they were some of the most gracious, enthusiastic and laid-back travel companions I’ve ever had.

The food, the countryside, the people, the culture, the weather, the cities…we saw and did so much in such a short time and it was absolutely lovely.

Here are a few of my favourite images from our time in the Moroccan mountains…

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Small colourful shops at the famous Kasbah of Ait Ben Haddou.2015morooco1

This woman makes the most delicious bread known to mankind.

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Typical Moroccan decor.  Simple but colourful and warm.

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The perfect spot for lunch with views on the mountains, a lush green oasis and blooming bougainvillaea in every colour.

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The oasis of Flint, Morocco.2015morooco3

A visit to a typical weekly market near Ouarzazate,  This truck full of oranges was amazing.  So was the truck full of peas a little further down.

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Jazz hands.  Cactus style.2015morocco1

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My mother and I hiked up a steep mountain to get to this abandoned kasbah.  It was physically hard for her but she trudged through it and really pushed herself. I was so proud of her for persevering through the fatigue and pain and reaching the top. And I’m pretty sure she was tempted to push me down the mountain more than several times (I’ll admit it, I have a slight Drill Sergeant style while motivating people to push through pain).

Moroccan Snapshots *5*

6 May

Some last shots of our trip to Morocco.IMG_5733Stretching out a little injury.  Afterwards the instructor turned around happily and informed me “Pretty sure nothing is  broken”.  Ummm, okay.

IMG_5728They just looked so cool dragging their surfboards down K17 beach (up the coast from Agadir).  And these were the only clouds we saw during our entire 7 day trip.  Made the Atlantic feel that much colder. IMG_5773While visiting the souks of Agadir we got trapped in a little shop that sold teas, creams, herbs, spices and everything else you could ever imagine to cure any ailment a person could be inflicted with. For me the packaging was more attractive than all the proclaimed health benefits.  And yes, I did leave with a bag full of cactus cream, argan oil, teas and spices.
IMG_5766Mounds of colourful vegetables and striped columns at the Souk El Had in Agadir.IMG_5694

IMG_5763Making sand kasbahs on the beach.IMG_5768One of my favourite images of Morocco is always the pyramids of delicious spices.  I have already gone through half of what I purchased.  Guess that means I’ll have to get back there soon to buy some more.

 Moroccan Snapshots *1*, *2*,*3*,*4*

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Moroccan Snapshots *4*

16 Apr

A few more shots from our trip to Morocco.  IMG_5431On our road-trip from the mountains to the sea we passed this extremely bizarre American style gas station in the middle of nowhere.  And when I say in the middle of nowhere I mean that there were only rocky mountains and stone fields in every direction as far as the eye could see.  It seems that it is the leftovers from the film set of the movie “The Hills Have Eyes”.  Slightly (very) creepy.IMG_5478Lovely blue door and tiles in our hotel in the small city of Taroudant.IMG_5621I wanted to bring home every single one of those colourful carpets from the Souk in Taroudant.IMG_5628Coca Cola sign and sky-blue taxis.  A perfect colour combination.IMG_5681-001Our first moments on the beach just north of Agadir. 

 Moroccan Snapshots *1*
Moroccan Snapshots *2*
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Moroccan Snapshots *3*

1 Apr

A few more snapshots of our recent trip to Morocco…

IMG_5372Colourful carpet on the side of the road.IMG_5174
Doesn’t get much more modern than this.IMG_5382As you can tell, he wasn’t amused.  These sheep (along with goats, chickens and a donkey) lived in the inner courtyard of a family home in the Atlas Mountains.

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Beautiful light.  Beautiful sun spots.

IMG_5268Considering the fact these were the harem rooms for 80 concubines I wasn’t sure opening that cupboard was such a good idea.IMG_5222

Beautiful old Kasbah, blue skies and stork nests.
IMG_5325He was protecting the DYNAMITE that was buried under that dirt and stone mound in the background. And yes, we did have a picnic in a chicken coop next to it. (taken at a salt mine)

Moroccan Snapshots *1*
Moroccan Snapshots *2*

Moroccan Snapshots *2*

19 Mar

A few more snapshots from our trip to Morocco…

IMG_4913Our favourite Moroccan cat sleeping on the outdoor terrace of our favourite Moroccan guesthouse.

IMG_4995 Almond blossoms with abandoned Kasbah in the background.

IMG_4971Oasis.

IMG_5038After a 5 hour hike to an isolated Berber village we were invited to have lunch in a local family’s home.  They made us the best tasting meal of our lives using this simple gas fire and metal tagine.

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Moroccan chicken.  Without the delicious spices. Yet.
IMG_5166A great way to sit back and relax after a 10 hour hike in the mountains.

Moroccan Snapshots *1*

Moroccan Snapshots *1*

12 Mar

A few images of my latest trip to Morocco…

IMG_4819-001Arriving at Menara Marrakech Airport.IMG_4840-001Lovely little carpet shop along the side of the road. Regretting not buying one.IMG_4854-001Handmade Berber carpet with Berber sheep (in the wind)

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Delivery truck that was teetering back and forth from the height and weight of those sacks.  A bit scary to drive behind.IMG_4861-001

My dream car.  Pink back-window curtain and all.IMG_4869-001

He wasn’t as sweet as he looks in the photo.

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Our first tagine of the trip.  Eaten on a quaint little outdoor terrace under the hot sun overlooking the atlas mountains.  Nice.

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Typical Moroccan painted metal door (with small stone village in background) 

I’ll be back with more snapshots soon!

Gratefully Gratefully *8*

2 Mar

We’re just back from an amazing week in Morocco.  We spent time hiking in the mountains, eating the most delicious Moroccan meals, visiting ancient Kasbahs, driving through the ever-changing mountainous landscapes, speaking French, building sandcastles on the beach and even surfing.  It was a full week to say the least.  And even arriving back in a freezing cold and rainy Italy at midnight didn’t dampen our high spirits.  Many family memories were made that will last a lifetime.  And obviously for that I’m extremely grateful.  As you’ll see, my grateful post is pretty Morocco inspired this week.

I’m grateful for…

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…Moroccan olives.  I miss them already

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…this neighbourhood outside of Agadir with painted trees in bright and cheerful colours and patterns.

IMG_5796…Mint Tea.  We drank it daily and even brought home a few bundles of fresh Moroccan mint and a new teapot to make some ourselves.

I wish you all a lovely week ahead!

Gratefully Grateful *1**2**3**4*, *5*,*6*,*7*

Moroccan Purchases

26 Apr

Whenever we get back from a trip people are always so curious as to what sort of souvenirs or items we bought while traveling around.  We don’t usually do a lot of shopping on our family vacations (because we all know how much kids LOVE to shop)  but we always try and bring back a few keepsakes for ourselves and gifts for friends and family (read here and here to find what we purchased in Japan).

And of course in Morocco we had to check out the world famous souks off the Jemaa El Fna Square in Marrakesh.  The kids loved getting lost in the winding narrow alleyways full of  interesting shops selling everything you could ever imagine.

I have to admit I’m not a big fan of bargaining and bartering about prices (although I am good at it!).  I’m always scared of offending the shop owner and /or getting colossally ripped off.  In any case, I’m pretty sure we we paid way too much for some of the things we purchased (you can always tell when they quickly agree to the first price you offer).

1-IMG_7804These babouche are by far my favorite purchase.  They are so bright, colourful and actually quite comfortable.  One shopkeeper told us that they are made out of camel leather and are hand-stitched   The kids each picked out a pair for themselves and some pairs to bring back for good friends.  We paid between 5€ and 7€ a pair ($6.50-$9).  Quite a bargain for something so unique and typically Moroccan.  Only downside is that they have a very pungent and distinctive smell.  One of my kids suggested it could be what the inside of a goat’s bowel would smell like.  Over the last months it has improved a bit but it’s still there (despite my constant spraying of Sandalwood perfume).

1-IMG_7829And of course we couldn’t come home without a tagine.  I would have loved to bring back one of the beautifully hand painted larger ones that are available for purchase everywhere but we just didn’t have space in our luggage.  So instead we picked out some of the smaller versions which are usually used for salt/pepper/cumin.  The kids bought some to bring back to their teachers and I brought some to use here at home.  We paid anywhere from 1€-3€ ($1.50-$4).

1-IMG_7837As soon as I saw a tiny shop which sold tassles of every kind I was like a kid in a candy shop.  They had every size and colour imaginable and were available in everything from cotton to velvet to leather.  I ended up buying three leather ones (€2/$2.50) which I’ll use for key chains or to hang on hand sewn purses and bags  and a whole bunch of tiny little cotton ones in the loveliest colours  (0.15€/20¢ each).  I wish I’d bought so many more.

1-IMG_7813The souks of Marrakesh are famous for their leather goods.  You can get beautiful purses of every style and colour (and quality).  I found several purses which I loved and didn’t end up buying due to the “smell factor” that we had with the babouche slippers.  The kids bought these sweet little 3-pocket leather wallets above (3€/$4 each) and a few leather bracelets (3 for €2/$2.50).  There are many many styles of wallets, bracelets, purses and belts to choose from.  Just be careful for quality and how the leather is dyed or painted.

1-IMG_7845You absolutely can’t go to Morocco and not buy their world famous Argan Oil.  These oil is made from the kernals of the Argan Tree which is endemic to Morocco.  It is used for both culinary and cosmetic purposes and is said to have many healing and medicinal purposes (aging, rheumatism, acne, scarring).  We stopped at a Women’s Co-op in the Atlas mountains and bought a few little bottles to give it a try.  I’ll let you know if it changes my life.  I paid about €7/$9 for a small 40ml bottle.

1-IMG_7879I also picked up this gorgeous rag rug while we were traveling in the Atlas Mountains.  I saw it hanging outside a tiny shop at the summit of one of the mountains we drove over on our travels and I knew it would be perfect in our home.  I was tempted to buy the large version but lack of suitcase space made it so that I left with the smaller version (€10/$13).  It looks perfect in my son’s lego corner of our livingroom.

All along the mountainous roads we came across men selling these crystallized rocks that they found in various mines and caves.  My kids fell in love with them and ended up using some of their travel money to purchase some for themselves and friends.  We were told they were all naturally coloured.  In any case it’s quite impressive to open the dull black stones and find these beautifully coloured crystal insides.  Everyone who comes to our house has to admire these stones before getting past the front hall.  They cost between €2 and €4 ($2.50-$5.50).1-IMG_7855We also bought some painting pigments in one of the many spice shops.  These vibrantly coloured powders just need to be mixed with lemon juice and are great for painting or dying cotton clothing (see here what the kids painted). These pigments are sold by the gram  and we paid about €3/$4 total for all of them.

Have you ever been to Morocco and purchased anything special?

Traveling With Kids: Marrakesh

28 Mar

Time for another of my Traveling With Kids columns over on the fabulous creative parenting blog Classic Play.  This time I write about our time spent in the city of  Marrakesh during our recent trip to Morocco.  Marrakesh is a charismatic city full of so much colour and culture.  After our calm time in the Atlas Mountains it was quite a culture shock to arrive in this busy and charismatic city full of everything from monkey tamers, to donkey carriages to vendors selling everything under the sun.  Pop on over to Classic Play to read (and see) more!

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Have you ever been to Marrakesh?  What was your favorite spot in the city to visit?

Moroccan Pigment Painting

14 Mar

1-IMG_6298As some of you may know last month we spent a week visiting the beautiful country of Morocco (see my travel column about our time in the Atlas Mountains here).  While in Marrakesh we spent quite a bit of time wandering through the maze of souks (markets) and admiring all the various stalls and shops selling leather purses and slippers, ceramic bowls, carpets, jewelry, antiques and pretty much anything else you could ever desire.

One of our favorite shops to visit were the spice shops.  They were full of bottles upon bottles filled with every kind of spice and herb you could ever imagine.  The aroma these shops give off can be smelled from far away and is almost intoxicating while you’re actually inside.

At the shop above we bought little plastic sacks filled with freshly ground cumin (did you know in Morocco they put salt and cumin on the dining table instead of salt and pepper?), Moroccan 35 spice, the most intense yellow tumeric I’ve ever seen, Moroccan curry and the most amazing and pungent smelling cinnamon ever.  Since returning home I’ve tried all my spices and they are absolutely amazing.  They add so much  flavour to any dish.

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But the most intriguing items we bought in one of these little spice shops were the coloured powdered pigments.  At first we had no idea what all the jars full of coloured water were but the kind shop owner Mohammed explained that these are pigments used for painting and dying clothing.  As a lover of bright colours and anything creative I decided to buy some to experiment with back home on a rainy day.  As luck would have it, the week after we arrived home we had a stay-at-home day and these pigments were the perfect activity to stay warm in front of the fireplace.

Mohammed told us to mix small amounts of the pigment powders with lemon juice.  I think the kids had just as much fun doing this than the actual painting.  The colours turned out so vibrant and reminiscent of the colours we saw everywhere in Morocco.

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The paint has quite a different texture to normal paints and actually dries with a beautiful smooth and almost shiny finish.

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It’s not often that these big kids of mine have time to sit down and paint for a morning like we did so often in the past.  I have to admit that I loved every single minute of it.

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